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Concrete Swimming Pool Videos

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Concrete pool videos

The videos highlighted here are just a few of the videos from the Swimming Pool Steve Youtube Channel. You can scroll through the pool videos or you can jump to the pages for:

Concrete Pool Videos
Plaster Pool Videos
Vinyl Liner Pool Videos
Measuring Pool Liners
Pool Pumps Introduction
Pool Pump Troubleshooting
Variable Speed Pool Pumps
Pool Filter Videos
Salt Water Pool Videos
Swimming Pool Questions & Answers


Concrete Swimming Pools

Can You Put A Vinyl Liner In A Concrete Pool?

Since concrete pools can be expensive to repair and difficult to find experienced technicians in some areas the question of whether you can install a vinyl liner in a concrete pool comes up often. Despite the fact that this is something that you will occasionally see it is certainly not recommended from a longevity point of view. When faced with expensive interior surface repairs for older concrete pools hanging a vinyl liner can seem like a fast and cheap alternative to the correct renovation procedure. In the short term this would result in a functioning swimming pool however the liner itself will experience early failure in almost every circumstance.

Many liner manufacturers will not produce a liner requested for a concrete pool and this should be a good indication to the average consumer that hanging a vinyl liner in a concrete pool is a bad idea even if you have a local "pool guy" who is telling you it is a legitimate option. Very few pool guys are experienced with both concrete and vinyl liner pools. Typically vinyl liner installers do not have the ability to correctly renovate a concrete pool and so they promote the product that they do sell - vinyl liners.


What Kind Of Paint Should I Use On A Concrete Pool

There are three common types of concrete swimming pool paint which are epoxy, chlorinated (or synthetic) rubber and acrylic. These paints are not interchangeable and if your pool is already painted you must be certain to recoat with the correct paint or it is very likely the new paint will not bond and will delaminate from the pool surface.

The two options for determining what type of paint you have currently is to either do a solvent test or send paint chips to your pool paint manufacturer and they will perform a solvent test for you (usually for free). Acrylic water based paints will soften if you apply denatured alcohol (with a rag for example) and rubber based paints will soften with acetone. Epoxy being the most resilient will not soften with these two solvents and instead needs something stronger like xylene or MEK (methyl ethyl ketone). You need to use the type of paint that is already on your pool with the exception of the water based paints which can potentially be applied to properly prepared surfaces of rubber based or epoxy paints. This is a good option for some pool owners as while the acrylic paint has the shortest longevity and chemical resistance it is the least expensive pool paint and is easy to install making it suitable for pool owners who want to be able to maintain their own pool in the future. Epoxy and rubber based paints should generally only be installed by professionals due to the extensive preparation requirements to the pool for successful bonding of the paint to the pool surface.





What Is The Best Interior Surface Coating For A Concrete Pool?

A common question from concrete pool owners is which is the best interior surface coating for a concrete pool. Technically tile would be the most premium interior surface however this would be an additional $30,000 to $100,000 or more over the regular plaster interior surface option in most areas. This is due to the high cost of tile as well as the time consuming installation process required for this premium interior surface option.

Of the more common interior surface options the best would be a dense mortar plaster made with marble dust, sand or powderized crystal as the aggregate. This is commonly called simply pool plaster or marbelite. Most residential concrete pools are built with a plaster interior surface and it is not until the renovation stage of life that pool paint is considered as an option. Pool paint is a very good band-aid for the true interior surface option plaster. Pebble, natural stone and manufactured interior surface options are similar in quality to traditional pool plasters. The cost of pool plaster is the main disadvantage versus paint solutions as they can cost 2-3 times as much as paint options however they also have the ability to last 2-3 times as long as paint and are certainly a more luxurious interior surface coating. Plaster is however more susceptible to damage from improper chemical balancing in the water and you can be sure if you ruin your $10,000 pool plaster due to bad chemistry it is bound to ruin your entire day.


Can I Drain My Concrete Swimming Pool?

Draining a concrete swimming pool is a risky enterprise and there is always an assumed risk when doing so. Whenever you do drain a concrete pool it is to specifically perform a service such as renovating the interior surface and then the goal is to fill the pool again as soon as possible to mitigate the risk in having it empty. A concrete pool has the ability to pop (lift) out of the ground given just the right set of circumstance. The major concerns are the level of the ground water surrounding the pool as well as the ability for the pool to equalize itself with the surrounding ground water. For this reason it is common to put off concrete pool renovations during rainy seasons where the surrounding water tables might be high. Having a sump pit permanently installed next to the pool is one way to help control the level of the water table surrounding the pool.

The main component that protects your pool from this hydrostatic pressure is the hydrostatic relief valve in the bottom of the main drain in your pool. It is important to note that sometimes these units can fail over time and sometimes they are removed and replaced by a permanent plug by someone who does not understand the importance of having an HRV in the main drain. When draining your concrete pool you want to access the main drain as soon as the water level allows so that you can remove the HRV during the renovation allowing the water table outside the pool to equalize with the pool itself.


What Is A Hydrostatic Relief Valve?

A hydrostatic relief valve is a very small component that performs an incredibly important function in concrete (and fiberglass) pools. A spring loaded check valve that allows water to pass in one direction which enables the pool to equalize pressure with the water table surrounding the pool. This helps to protect the pool from lifting out of the ground should the pressure of the water table become greater than the pressure of the water in the pool.

Located in a spot difficult to service, in the main drain in the bottom of the pool, the HRV will often be original from when the pool was installed. Since the spring in the HRV is a mechanical contact it is prone to failure with age, any time that you have the pool drained enough to access the HRV it is recommended to replace it with a new one. Any time you are draining your pool you would want to remove the hydrostatic valve completely during the course of the renovation. While you can plug it for short periods of time while you refinish the interior surface of the pool you want to keep this time to an absolute minimum to limit the risk of catastrophic failure should the pool lift out of the ground.


How To Remove Calcium From My Pool Tiles?


Calcium deposits on swimming pool tiles is called efflorescence and can be a visually unappealing problem to have and one that is very difficult to resolve. Once you have noticed that you have this problem there is very little you can do to prevent it from returning other than removal and reinstallation of the tiles completely using a mud-bed that contains lime. even still, cracking of the substrate concrete can allow water to track through the concrete which will allow the efflorescence to grow again.

The solution most pool owners will need with this problem is to use full strength white vinegar and a soft scrub brush like those available at most pool and spa supply stores. The brush does most of the work to remove the scale and the vinegar helps to discourage the efflorescence from immediately returning. Efflorescence scale is extremely hard and well bonded to the tile and will be exceedingly difficult to remove even with the scrub brush. Pools with this problem should adopt a maintenance schedule that scrubs problem areas with a scrubber and vinegar regularly even before efflorescence returns.


Concrete Pool Videos
Plaster Pool Videos
Vinyl Liner Pool Videos
Measuring Pool Liners
Pool Pumps Introduction
Pool Pump Troubleshooting
Variable Speed Pool Pumps
Pool Filter Videos
Salt Water Pool Videos
Swimming Pool Questions & Answers



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InTheSwim.com
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- Swimming Pool Steve


Basecrete flexible bondcoat
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- Swimming Pool Steve


LightStream swimming pool financing
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Pool installations can be very expensive especially when you start to add optional extras. Building a pool is a once in a lifetime event for most people and it is important to get the pool you want. Swimming pool financing can help you get the pool you want and make sure you have the money you need to do it right the first time.

- Swimming Pool Steve


Pool Supplies Canada
www.PoolSuppliesCanada.ca

When it comes to ordering pool and spa supplies online in Canada www.PoolSuppliesCanada.ca is by far the best option. They carry everything from chemicals to replacement pumps to entire pool kits, with free shipping options and more "in stock" items than any other Canadian online retailer.

- Swimming Pool Steve